The Power in Prayer

“The prayer of a righteous person is powerful and effective. Elijah was a human being, even as we are. He prayed earnestly that it would not rain, and it did not rain on the land for three and a half years. Again he prayed, and the heavens gave rain, and the earth produced its crops.” (James 5:16-18)

“For the eyes of the Lord are on the righteous and his ears are attentive to their prayer . . . ” (1 Peter 3:12)

 

Last weekend when my hubby and I went to church, the pastor asked the congregation after the service if anyone wanted prayer for a family member who needed salvation. At that particular moment, I didn’t raise my hand, because to my delight, I was recalling how many of my family members and Randy’s family members have almost all given their lives to Christ over the years.

 

The years that have passed were filled with heartfelt prayer for them, and it was a wonderful thing to see God at work in their lives during that time and even now. It is not only evidence that the Lord hears us, but also a faith-affirming and substantive witness of nothing less than the divine working among the mundane day-in and day-out things of life.

 

I am learning to make life one long prayer, little snippets of praise and thanks and S.O.S’s sent up to the throne of grace throughout the day, not just during my quiet time with the Lord. It’s easy to forget to lean on Jesus when we’re more accustomed to going it alone and flying by the seat of our pants. Yet, like any good habit we start, it takes time for it to feel natural. I would like to make my prayer life as natural as taking a breath, because prayer in our spirits is like breath in our lungs. Prayer is air. It’s reliance on God that animates our spiritual life. It helps us grow in righteousness, trust the Lord’s goodness, and endure until the end.

 

A believer without a prayer life usually shows immaturity, a lack of faith, and short-lived enthusiasm for the Christian life. The solution? Pray, not only for them, but model it, too. Help them learn to talk to God themselves. There is something about interacting with the Most High God of heaven and earth, whether it is a casual chit-chat or a heartfelt plea for help, that makes me feel not only loved, but also valued dearly.

 

Late last year I decided to “adopt” a persecuted Christian in Darfur, Sudan. She had been in prison in this Muslim country for many months on trumped-up charges with the death penalty hanging over her head. I wrote to her, sending her scripture quotations that could be translated into her language. I then made it a point to bring her to the throne of grace every day. I prayed for about two months. One night, I was sitting at my computer and heard in the background a newscast about a Sudanese woman who had just been released from prison. I missed the name, so I looked it up on the Internet. It was her! Praise God Almighty! All the prayers that went up to the Lord from her family, her husband, her children, Christian workers, and all the other saints that prayed . . .He hears the prayers of his children!

 

I would like to encourage you to pray for someone regularly, perhaps a missionary, a Christian in a persecuted country, a family member, a friend, and as a special challenge, the guy that cut you off in traffic. Or someone else you’re mad at. Seriously. I guarantee that if you ask with love as the motive, you will see the Lord work in amazing ways, and neither you nor the person(s) you are praying for will ever be the same.

 

Love, the First Commandment

He answered, “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind’; and, ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.'” –Luke 10:27

I recently read the parable of the good Samaritan, and couldn’t help but notice the first commandment that God gave the Israelites was to love him. And it wasn’t to be a casual love, but a whole-hearted, deep-in-your-soul, to-your-last-breath, wholly-conscious love. This must have been a unique concept of God at the time, for I can’t imagine people who worshipped pagan gods felt any affection for their idols. It is the only true God who initiates relationship with his creation. And while the Israelites were making their golden calf, God penned this first commandment: love. The same kind of love that Jesus had for his Father, that empowered him to walk, talk, eat, and breathe his Father’s will. The same kind of love that was poured out on the early church and created leaders like Paul who left all for the sake of Christ, or like Peter who, although he denied knowing Jesus three times, ultimately died a martyr. After the resurrection, what did Jesus ask Peter three times? Do you love me?

I felt the Holy Spirit asking me the same question. After some thoughtful consideration, I said, “Yes, BUT not as passionately as I should.” I think about the times I say no to God, and realize that it is those very times that are an opportunity to deny myself and follow Jesus. I think what our Heavenly Father was trying to tell me was that at the point of my “no” there is a false god or something that I love more hindering me. God did not make love the first commandment by mistake. It is out of love for Him that all things flow. It is out of love for the Father that the Son left his glory and became like us, yet obedient to death, even death on the cross. It is out of this kind of love that Jesus was able to say, “Father, if you are willing, take this cup from me; yet not my will, but yours be done.” (Luke 22:42)

PRAYER: Dear Father, pour out in our hearts your Holy Spirit, that he may fan the love in our hearts into a holy love for you that is steadfast and without reserve. In the precious name of Jesus, Amen!